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Nama and the Banking Crisis

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These three letters from me about Nama and the banking crisis were published in the Sunday Business Post over the three Sundays commencing 18th April 2010:

Updated Cost of Crisis

On 22nd March you published a letter from me indicating that the banking crisis could cost taxpayers up to €35 billion. In the light of recent revelations, my "worst" case estimate has been upped to €47 billion. This is additional to related interest payments, social and economic costs and forfeiture of future investment opportunities.

How is this going to be paid for? Surely, it would be unrealistic to expect the cost to be shouldered by the lower paid who, by definition, are having trouble making ends meet. On this basis, the only realistic answer is a new levy on high earners on the grounds that they can still enjoy boom-time lifestyles and probably don't pay full taxes thanks to untaxed pension contributions and tax allowances arising from the ill-fated building binge. I can think of several memorable names for such a levy!

Lead letter published on 18th April 2010.

Haircuts and Scalping

Much attention has focused on the larger than expected haircut on the €81 billion of bank loans going into Nama. However, this haircut amounts to a scalping for taxpayers as it means that developers will walk away from residual debts of €36 billion if Nama merely breaks even over the next decade.

Accordingly, Nama's mission must be to collect as much of the haircut as possible - every unpaid billion euro is in effect a donation by taxpayers to developers' gambling debts and their incompetent banking pals. This means no sweetheart deals or fire sales, and maximum enforcement no matter how long it takes or difficult it proves.

Lead letter published on 25th April 2010.

Phantom Funds

Your front page headline "Phantom funds make up to 66% of INBS income" (25th April) could just as easily refer to Nama. Buried in the financial projections of Nama's draft business plan is evidence that it expects to roll up about €5 billion of interest in its initial three years and there is no indication that any of these phantom funds or "unrealised interest" will ever be paid. Indeed, I estimate that they could amount to €11 billion over ten years to 2020 and would almost equal the projected interest actually paid by borrowers. The Nama plan is silent on this possible write off.

It is interesting to see how the plan, issued with great flourish and used to justify Nama to the electorate and secure Eurostat approval for off-balance sheet borrowing, has been suddenly downgraded to "illustrative"  before a Joint Oireachtas Committee. Of course, the best approach would be to include Nama in the Freedom of Information Act to facilitate access to details of Nama's plans and operations.

Letter published on 2nd May 2010.

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This page contains a single entry by Brian published on May 3, 2010 11:17 AM.

Changing the Irish Constitution was the previous entry in this blog.

Nama's Website is the next entry in this blog.

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